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Glaucoma

Care Redefined

Advancing excellence in glaucoma treatment and surgery through leading in glaucoma care

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THE MISSION

Our mission is to enhance patient outcomes, streamline clinical workflows, and provide healthcare professionals with innovative tools that elevate the standard of glaucoma treatment. By prioritizing efficiency, safety, and precision, we strive to lead the industry in delivering exceptional value and transforming the future of ophthalmic care.

THE CHALLENGE

Glaucoma is a major cause of blindness globally and incurs significant economic costs, particularly in the United States. Here are some key points:

PREVALENCE:

3 Million

People in the US


80 Million

People globally

IMPACT:

22 Million

People affected by irreversible open blindness worldwide


28 %

Growth rate per decade

ECONOMIC COST:

$2.8 Million

Direct cost to the US annually (2022)


$12 Billion

Projected cost by 2032 and $17.3 billion by 2050

PREVALENCE:

$44,037

Productivity losses per year, per affected individual


The symptoms

Glaucoma is often called the “silent thief of sight” because it usually has no symptoms until significant vision loss has occurred. However, there are some signs and symptoms to watch for, including:​

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Gradual Loss of Peripheral Vision:

Often the first noticeable symptom, especially in open-angle glaucoma.

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Tunnel Vision:

In the advanced stages of the disease.

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Severe Eye Pain:

Associated with acute angle-closure glaucoma.

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Nausea and Vomiting:

Accompanying severe eye pain.

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Blurred Vision:

Especially during a sudden onset.​

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Headaches:

Often in conjunction with eye pain.​

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Redness in the Eye:

This can be a sign of glaucoma.

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Halos Around Lights:

Seeing rainbow-colored rings around lights.​

Regular eye exams are crucial for early detection and management of glaucoma to prevent significant vision loss.​

The Silent Thief of Sight

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  • Increased pressure inside the eye due to a buildup of excess fluid (Aqueous Humor)
  • No or few symptoms in early stages
  • Treatment is aimed at lowering pressure.
  • Surgery (traditional and minimally invasive create new pathways to increase flow)
  • No single test detects glaucoma.
  • Half the people with glaucoma do not know they have it.
  • Topical medication (reduce fluid production or improve flow).
  • Irreversible damage to the optic nerve​

Current Glaucoma Treatments

Traditional Interventions

Existing surgical and pharmaceutical treatments for glaucoma, such as trabeculectomies, laser trabeculoplasty, and topical adrenergic agonists, are highly effective but come with significant risks.


THESE PROCEDURES OFTEN RESULT IN:

  • Intra-operative Complications: Issues that arise during the surgery itself, increasing the complexity and risk of the procedure.​
  • Post-operative Complications: Problems that occur after surgery, potentially leading to prolonged recovery times or additional treatments.​
  • Failure Risk: The possibility that the treatment may not achieve the desired outcome, necessitating further interventions.​

Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS)

Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS) aims to bridge the gap between high efficacy and safety. Types of MIGS include XEN gel implants, canaloplasties, and microshunts.


THESE PROCEDURES OFFER:

  • Reduced Complication Rates: MIGS techniques are designed to minimize the risks associated with traditional surgeries.
  • Quicker Recovery: Patients often experience faster recovery times compared to more invasive surgeries.
  • Lower Efficacy: Despite their advantages, MIGS procedures are generally less effective than trabeculectomies in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP).